Even in the Shower, the Temptation to Text Is Too Great

Have you ever been surprised to see your teen texting during an inappropriate time, such as at a religious procession or while driving? Turns out, they’re not trying to be rude or put themselves in danger. According to a new study, they just can’t help it.

Researchers at Penn State University asked 152 college aged students to fill out a 70-question survey on their texting habits and attitudes toward texting in various situations.

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Instilling a Life-Long Love of Fitness

When you ask most adults to recall their experience in middle school PE, you get a wide array of responses, but very few of them are pleasant. Climbing the rope, awkward attempts at pull-ups with underdeveloped arms, being last to get picked for teams — the list goes on.

This isn’t the fault of the well-meaning PE teachers we worked with. Most of them were coaches and athletes themselves, and grew up believing that anyone could be an athlete if they just tried hard enough.

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Powerful Images Could Prevent Teens From Smoking

It’s no secret that smoking isn’t a healthy habit, but sometimes teens decide to take the risk. So, what will help to keep them from lighting that cigarette? A new study found that the answer may lie in cigarette packaging.

Researchers surveyed two groups of people — half were smokers and the other half did not smoke. Each participant was shown various health warning labels on cigarettes packaging that state negative consequences associated with smoking. These consequences included lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, vascular disease, and eye conditions. Some packages had a combination of text and image warnings, while others only had text warnings.

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Believe It Or Not, Video Games Can Boost Teens’ Brains

Before you tell your teen to put down their video games, read this first! Despite the belief that video games may make teens more violent or causes them to lose empathy, a new study suggests gaming has brain benefits. Research from Brown University found that video games not only sharpen the visual learning process, but may also improve the brain’s ability to process visual tasks.

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Why Teens Shouldn’t Sip Energy Drinks Before Sports Practice

Recently we talked about how energy drinks can make middle schoolers hyperactive and distracted. In case that’s not enough of an incentive to cut back on these caffeinated beverages, this new study might change their minds. According to an article published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, research shows that energy drinks could be a serious danger to adolescents’ cardiac health.

Nearly one in three teens (ages 12-19) consume energy drinks regularly. That’s a lot of teens—and a lot of caffeine.

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Puberty Resources & Advice For Parents of Preteens

We’ve just finished up with our puberty unit for the 6th graders, and oftentimes, it’s more stressful for the parents than it is for the kids. Comfort levels vary, and they might not have received any education on the topic themselves, except for a slightly awkward conversation with their own parents.

They want to do right by their kids and support them as they’re going through these changes, but they need a little support from us as their health teachers as well.

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This Popular Trick To Keep Teens from Drinking May Backfire

Have you ever let your kid try a sip of your wine or beer? It’s seemingly harmless, right? A new study shows that kids who sample their parent’s alcohol may be more likely to binge drink when they’re older.

Researchers surveyed 561 students periodically over three years. Students who sipped their parent’s alcoholic drinks by sixth grade were five times more likely to drink a full alcoholic beverage by the time they were in their first semester of high school than their peers. They were four times more likely to get drunk or binge drink.

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Peer Pressure Influences Teens’ Decision-Making, But Here Are Ways To Avoid It

Most of us are familiar with the concept of “peer pressure” — where teens can be persuaded by their friends to participate in risky activities that they otherwise might avoid. Now a new study from University College London supports this idea that adolescents’ judgment is affected mostly by what their peers think, compared to what adults think.

For the study, participants ranked the riskiness of a variety of situations — from crossing at a red light to walking through a dark alley. Afterwards, they were told how either adults or teens ranked the same situations. Then they re-assessed their own ranking of how dangerous these activities were.

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This Healthy Eating Trick Isn’t Always Best For Teens

Drink a cold glass of water before each meal. Eat a big, nutritious breakfast. Keep a food journal. Use smaller plates. We’ve all heard the tips and tricks to help you change your eating habits, but do they really work? A new study shows that at least one doesn’t, particularly for overweight teens.

Researchers at the University of Connecticut tested how attentive teen girls were to portion sizes and quizzed them about their perception of the amount of food on different sized plates. There were 162 girls ages 14 to 18 involved in the study. The researchers found that overweight teenage girls were less attentive, on average, to these visual cues of different types than their peers.

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The Surprising Fact About Teens in the Workforce

Is your teen having trouble landing that job interview they’ve been hoping for? Has he or she found it difficult to even find job openings they’d be interested in? If so, they’re not alone.

A recent study shows that the number of jobs held by teens shrank by 33 percent between 2001 and 2014. Even positions you’d expect teens to hold like a hostess at a restaurant or a counter attendant at your local coffee shop saw a decline in teenage workers.

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